Apple Music vs. Spotify: Streaming showdown3 min read

Lincoln Aftergood and Mimi Lemar, Reporters

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Apple Music, by Lincoln Aftergood:

When my friends ask me if I listen to Spotify, I laugh and say no. I exclusively use Apple Music as it is a better option than Spotify.

Apple Music has many crucial advantages over Spotify. For one, it has a library of 50 million songs providing a vast variety of music selections, while Spotify only has around 35 million songs. Apple Music also signs artists for exclusive sneak-peaks of songs, interviews and behind-the-scenes videos, unlike Spotify.

Not only does Apple Music have more songs, but it is easier to share playlists and mixes with friends. If you want to listen to a friend’s playlist, there is a whole section dedicated to just that, in addition to what your friend has recently been listening to. Combine this aspect with the multitude of playlists created by Apple’s “curated experts” that are updated each day to get an endless amount of song selections.

The experts regularly update the playlists with new songs being shuffled in and older songs being taken out. This constant variety is a refreshing experience for the listener and provides an opportunity to hear the latest songs from your favorite artists.

One of the most crucial aspects of Apple Music that makes it superior to Spotify is the app itself. The simple layout makes it easy to follow where all the features are and to keep track of your own songs. Additionally, the ease of downloading songs and creating playlists makes it a pleasure to use Apple Music.

You might say that Spotify is better because it has a free option. However, both paid accounts are $9.99 and Spotify’s free accounts are riddled with commercials even while music is playing. Apple Music has a free option as well where you can listen to its radio stations such as the popular Beats One Radio or others.

The decision between downloading either Spotify or Apple Music is an easy one to make as Apple Music has a better layout and more variety.

Spotify, by Mimi Lemar:

Spotify is the trailblazer, the trendsetter, the community builder and the opportunity giver. Whenever I am in a bad mood, I put my headphones in and open Spotify. I love seeing what my friends are listening to and what songs are on the playlists Spotify customizes for me.

The music is not what makes the app; it’s the app that makes the music. Spotify gives users so much more than music. From podcasts, artist playlists, concert listings, friend activity, audiobooks, personalized playlists and so much more, Spotify is the whole package.

Users can create playlists, have access to all the songs available in the app, and listen while traveling abroad without even paying for premium. This free feature is incredible, and is geared towards those who cannot afford to pay for music.

Although Spotify might not be as visually appealing as Apple Music, Spotify launched about eight years before Apple Music and was an innovator in mainstreaming a low-cost music streaming service. Additionally, I can follow my friends, browse their playlists and see what they are listening to in real time. Many of my friends have incredible taste in music and help me expand my palette, since I am normally limited in my song selections.

Artist playlists can help you connect to your favorite artists and see what inspires them. Artists have an option to create their own playlists with their favorite songs that are open to users to listen to and follow. It is small things like this that distinguish Spotify from Apple Music.

Spotify is a true representation of a community that is geared to your passions and what you like. This community is created through following my friends and artists, and personalizing playlists. Whatever your music taste is, you can get the most out of using Spotify with its specific features designed to suit you.

These stories were featured in the Volume 36, Issue 6 print edition of The Lion’s Tale, published on May 23, 2019.

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